Monthly Archives: October 2018

British violinist Daniel Hope and Friends: AIR — A Baroque Journey

 

Daniel Hope

British violinist Daniel Hope cradling his favourite violin

I personally think the violin looks like one of the trickiest instruments to master. How can you pluck the strings AND use the bow at the same time, whilst grimacing? It takes preposterous skill.

Here’s British violinist Daniel Hope making it look easy:

And guess what? He’s coming to Toronto on Saturday, November 3 if you wanted to see some of that violin class in action.

British violinist Daniel Hope, “Among the best in the world as well as the most thoughtful,” (The Observer) returns to Koerner Hall with an outrageous romp through the baroque with a dazzling ensemble of virtuosi wandering minstrels.

Here’s all the deets …

The Royal Conservatory Presents Daniel Hope and Friends: AIR — A Baroque Journey
Saturday, November 3, 2018 at 8:00 p.m.
Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor Street West
Tickets start at only $45
For tickets call 416-408-0208 or visit https://www.rcmusic.com/events-and-performances/daniel-hope-and-friends-air-baroque-journey

You can also send him a little tweet too and welcome him to Toronto!

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Entry requirements reminder for Brits travelling to Canada

London to Toronto

Are we there yet? Are we there yet? Are we there yet?

Quick scary story. I went back home in the summer and booked online using my British passport. All well and good travelling across to the European mainland, up to Scotland and back down to London.

But when I tried to check in online 24 hours before my flight back to Toronto it wouldn’t let me do it and stated some scary message along the lines of — and I paraphrase — “not having the correct documentation,” “the Canadian government isn’t allowing you back in” and “you have to sort it out at the airport.”

I spat out my tea and then tried checking in again online using my Canadian passport. That went through without a hitch. Phew!

Having lived in Toronto for 18 years I got lazy with checking requirements to travel between the UK and Canada … and got caught out.

So this is a word of caution. With Christmas coming along and the possibility of having family and friends over, make sure all their paperwork is in order.

Here’s the official word from the UK government as a starting point.

Seeking British expats for a case study about homesickness being conducted in Toronto and pays approximately $750 if selected

Woman crying

“I really miss me mam, back ‘ome like. But $750 will definitely help me get over that sadness.”

A friend alerted me to this today — thanks Leanne! — and thought I’d pass it on. Might apply myself.

FYI: I have no connection to this company and it’s not an advert. So do your due diligence and Brits in Toronto can’t be held responsible for any woes that arise.

Here’s the original posting. Cut and paste begins … NOW.

Seeking British Expats for a case study about Homesickness being conducted in Toronto

Looking for British Expats – ages 20 to 60. Must be someone who was born and raised in Britain and later moved to Canada. Participants to the case study will be asked to share their experience with homesickness.

*Pays approximately $750 per person if selected.

Please send your name, age, phone number, tell us where you are from in England, how long have you lived here, where do you live currently, recent photos (no hat or sunglasses) and ideally a quick cell phone video of you answering this question: What do you miss most from back home?

Are you a Canadian Citizen or Permanent Resident?

Email – info@jigsawcasting.com

Please write ‘HOMESICKNESS’ in the subject line of your email, along with your name and age. (E.G. HOMESICKNESS – Josh Howard – age 38)

If selected, we will book you directly from submission. In order to be considered, please make sure you have sent in all required information above. Information collected will only be used to process your application. Participants will be recorded on video. Such video will only be used internally, unless other uses are expressly approved in writing by the participants. The case study is not conducted in the context of medical research. No counselling, medical advice or treatment will be provided in connection with the case study.

Submissions are due ASAP or before: Oct 18 at 9am.

You must be available for this key date (in Toronto):

Case study interview – October 24, 2018

Totally biased product review by me — Campbell’s Butter Chicken and Vegetables Soup

Butter chicken and vegetables soup

Heaven in a tin? If you’re too lazy to read the review, no

Was wandering around Loblaws at the weekend looking for the organic alfalfa sprouts section when I spotted two words on a tin that shouted BUY ME! Butter Chicken … soup. With veggies thrown in to make it a balanced meal. Sold!

Noticing that this soup was part of the famed Chunky range I hoped that the contents would live up to the lunchtime legacy — but, alas, not to be.

It wasn’t really a soup, per se (by or in itself or themselves; intrinsically), but more of a gloopy stew. It’s the kind that when you heat it up on the cooker, heat bubbles get trapped under the surface until they force their way up and explode out of the saucepan, like a butter chicken stew volcano eruption.

Had a quick sniff and — yes — it smelled like curry. More like a Mulligatawny soup actually, the kind that the Canadian government still won’t let Brits bring into the country from back home. But we’ve started a Twitter campaign to right that travesty!

Taste? Too tame. Butter chicken is on the mild end of the “sweat and blow your nose” spectrum but I was hoping for a touch more spice.

The vegetable-to-chicken ratio (VTCR) seemed too high and the “Chunky” bits of chicken were very small and a little tough for my liking. It did fill me up though, so that was a bonus.

Bit disappointing when all is said and done. Unfortunately have to give this curry product a Brits in Toronto 1/5 stars.