Tag Archives: immigration

Looking for Brits’ opinions on expat and new immigrant meetup/support groups

expat-groups

“Come and join our Punching The Air While Celebrating On-Cue Expat Group … it’s really fun!”

Been a busy week for people wanting to pick our readers’ brains!

Next up is Ryerson student Lauren who wants your opinion on expat and similar groups. We featured the Toronto Brit Meetup Group a while back, but there must be more out there that Lauren can chat to.

“I’m a journalism student at Ryerson University and for an assignment I am writing about expat and new immigrant meetup/support groups and how they help or hinder newcomers to Canada in integrating into Canadian society. I was wondering if you have been involved in any such groups and if you’d be willing to talk with me about your experience, or if you know other people who have done so and might be helpful.”

Some example questions …

  • How did expat groups help you settle in? Do you feel like they helped you join in with wider Canadian society (beyond other expats)?
  • Do you feel “just” British, “just” Canadian or both? Why/what makes you feel that way?
  • Do you think you’ve become “Canadianized”? Which country do you think you fit in with better now?
  • Is your social group now mainly made up of Canadians, other expats (either British or not), or a mix of both? How does that compare to when you first moved here? (if here for longer)
  • Do you see yourself staying in Canada, returning to Britain or moving somewhere else long-term?
  • If you have lived as an expat in another country, how does your experience there compare with your experience in Canada? What made it easier/harder to establish a life there?

“I would be interested in talking to both recent newcomers, people who have been in Canada for years and everything in between. I would start with a fairly quick (10-15 minute) phone conversation and if people would be willing to meet in person for a more in-depth discussion than is easy to do over the phone, that would be great. If anyone is part of an expat meetup group that has an event/gathering coming up, that I could join in with, I’d love to do that too.

“The assignment is due in mid-April, but I’d like to hear from people as soon as possible, not to rush you!”

So, if you’d like to help Lauren out and tell her about your experiences, please e-mail her at lauren DOT lydia DOT der AT ryerson DOT CA — and thanks in advance!

Free webinar about improvements to the Express Entry immigration system

express-entry-webinar

Just click and you’re in

Bit tired of the UK and feel like you need a change of scenery? How aboot Canada?!

On November 19, 2016, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada introduced several improvements to the Express Entry immigration system.

In the wake of these changes, Attorney David Cohen is holding an exclusive FREE webinar (November 29-30) on the topic of the revised system, and how potential immigrants to Canada can take advantage of the improvements that have been made.

Might be worth a butcher’s, right?

Here’s all the deets.

Immigration rules tweaked to make it easier for Americans. Er, hello? What about Brits too?

canada-america

Hey Canada, Brits can be your BFF too

So, let’s just get it of the way. Since we last posted, Donald Trump will become President of the United States and it’s horrible.

So horrible that the Canadian immigration website crashed, probably due to Americans desperately looking to move north. Not probably … 50% of IP addresses logged were Americans.

Fine. It’s a free country, check to see if you want.

But then this story from The Walrus caught our beady eye:

“Two days after Donald Trump was elected forty-fifth president of the United States, the Canadian government quietly tweaked our immigration system to make it easier for many Americans to move to Canada.

“The changes first surfaced in the Canada Gazette — the dull digital publication of record for the federal government — on Thursday afternoon. The notice was sandwiched between a list of meritorious service decorations awarded by the Governor General and changes to chemical classifications in the Environmental Protection Act. There was no press release, no backgrounder, no ministerial statement. The new rules, according to the notice, would take effect Saturday, November 19.

“Those rules mean that thousands of Americans currently working in Canada — and thousands more who want to move here — may be able to stay forever and eventually become citizens.”

Er, hello? What about the Brits that might want to come because of Brexit? We didn’t see a quick change in the immigration system to make it easier for them too.

If we’re missing something obvs then please correct us. Cheers!

Discuss.

p.s. “Canada’s immigration system is sometimes described as a labyrinth. That’s generous. Navigating the regulations can feel more like stumbling through dark caves without a flashlight while juggling kittens. Getting permission to come into the country to work or study temporarily is one thing. Getting the right to stay is another. There are dozens of different programs that lead to coveted permanent residence status; many of them rely on a complicated point system.”

Brits look to Canada after Brexit

Nigel Farage

If you don’t like this future, try Toronto!

CIC News carries a nice article today on how many Brits are looking towards Canada as the immigration destination of choice after the UK voted to leave the EU last week.

Some highlights of the article …

“As the results began to come in last week, and as it became clear that the ‘Leave’ option was edging out ‘Remain,’ Google reported an enormous spike in the UK for the search ‘move to Canada.'”

“Most new immigrants to Canada arrive under one of its many economic immigration programs. … There are programs for skilled workers at the federal level and in each of the provinces. A major advantage for English-speaking candidates is that English proficiency is deemed to be a highly desirable commodity for these programs, many of which are points-based, requiring candidates to reach a point threshold in order to become eligible.”

“Other options for working in Canada include being hired by a Canadian employer and obtaining a temporary work permit, or coming to Canada as an intra-company transferee. Many people who eventually settle in Canada permanently initially arrived with temporary work status.”

They even link to a handy free online assessment to find out if you are eligible for any of over 60 Canadian immigration programs.

The full article is here, highly recommended.

Proposed changes in the Canadian Citizenship Act would make it easier to meet requirements

John McCallum citizenship

John McCallum, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship welcomes new Canadian citizens

As New Canadians is reporting, proposed changes in the Canadian Citizenship Act would make it easier to meet requirements for those who want to become a Canadian citizen.

Brits in Toronto gets a lot of e-mails concerning finding jobs and the process of becoming a Canadian citizen. We can’t offer legal advice, but we can highlight the news, issues and organizations that can assist in some way. Check back often.

The two important parts for us in the proposed changes are, “the time required for permanent residents to be physically present in Canada before applying for citizenship will be reduced by a full year,” and “the Bill also proposes to repeal provisions that allow citizenship to be revoked from dual citizens if they engage in acts against the national interests.”

In effect, if you want to make a new life in Canada then you won’t have to wait as long. And if you do a crime, then prepare to do the time!

Pretty much common sense.

Immigration Minister: Significant changes to the Citizenship Act in the coming days

Come to Canada

There’s a better life to be had as an office worker, doctor, contractor and backpacking student hoping for an internship with a four-year $80,000 philosophy degree

The Globe and Mail is reporting that, “The Liberals will soon follow through on their election pledge to repeal the Conservatives’ controversial Bill C-24, which gave the government the power to revoke Canadian citizenship from dual citizens convicted of terrorism, treason or espionage.”

This caused an uproar when it was introduced as a lot of people with citizenship felt like second-class Canadians. Especially relevant to new immigrants that had come to Canada for a new life and gained citizenship.

Snip:

“Immigration Minister John McCallum said the government will also remove barriers to citizenship posed by Bill C-24.

“‘We believe that it’s better to make it easier rather than harder for people to become citizens.'”

Full story here and worth a read.

Brit in Toronto frustrated with immigration backlog

Caption

Free stock photo depicting a bloke in a snazzy hat who is a little bit frustrated about something

We spotted this story in yesterday’s Toronto Star about a British endocrinologist called Satya Dash living in Toronto for four years who is very frustrated with the current backlog in the immigration system.

Snip:

“In July, Dash was supposed to start as a staff physician at the University Health Network and teaching at the University of Toronto, but a backlog has put his new job on indefinite hold.

“Across Canada, the backlog — said to be the result of Ottawa’s deployment of much needed resources on the new Express Entry system — has wreaked havoc on the lives of thousands of Canadian Experience Class applicants.”

Worth a read.