Let’s all help fellow Brit Alex find a job!

Alex Irving

Say goodbye to quaint English country garden trestle tables and hello to condo patios where you have to book the BBQ!

Do you know what propaganda is? It’s when a Cockney takes a long look at Alex’s resume … and likes what he sees.

Alex contacted Brits in Toronto with the exciting news that he’s coming to Toronto on March 19 and would like to get a job ASAP.

“I have extensive experience in VIP client and supplier management and also in team management. Basically I’m looking for something in sales/ business development or partnership management.”

A quick scan of his resume using the patented HR slush pile bot reveals more: “I would best describe myself as a highly ambitious, self-motivated leader with an entrepreneurial spirit and strong desire for personal and professional growth. A keen focus on relationships is something I pride myself on maintaining to a high level with friends, colleagues and clients alike.”

So, if any connected Brits out there remember what it’s like to come to a new city and try to make a go of it, please reach out to Alex via his e-mail alexirving8 AT hotmail DOT COM or his LinkedIn profile.

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And A Scotch Egg: A British-style panel show

And A Scotch Egg

We can see Mr. Bean’s jacket and some mashed potato, but that’s about it

Dan e-mailed to let us know about a British-style panel show called And A Scotch Egg.

And A Scotch Egg is everything you love about British panel shows, brought to you live on stage every month at Comedy Bar.

In each show two hilarious teams of comedians face off in a series of quizzes, games and challenges in order to see who has the right combination of wit and wisdom to win the competition — and with it the people’s ovation and fame forever!

The theme for their first show is SCIENCE!

Team Marmalade: Mike Payne (captain) with special guests Lexa Graham and Joey Harlem.

Team Horseradish: Peter Fraser (captain) with special guests Brian Millward and Chris Sandiford.

Hosted by Dan Donnelly.

So if that sounds like a bit of a giggle, the first one is at 7:00 p.m. on Sunday, February 17 for $10 a ticket.

Let’s all help fellow Brit Nicole find a job!

nicole walters

Already thinking about a lunch expense account

Been a while since we posted so firstly … happy new year! Only about 346 days left till Christmas.

Let’s start off mid-January 2019 with helping a fellow Brit find a job.

Nicole will be making the big move to Toronto at the beginning of April this year on an International Experience Canada working holiday visa.

With regards to finding a job once she arrives, Nicole has been looking online at some Toronto-based recruitment agencies, and have even signed up to some local career fairs — however she would hugely appreciate it if anyone out there can offer some leads or advice for her job prospects when she arrives in this fair city.

On her arrival in Toronto she will be looking for an administrative or customer service based-role.

She has over eight years of administrative and secretarial experience and is happy to be put forward for either a temporary or contract position.

Nicole considers herself to be hardworking, motivated and adaptable with excellent organisation, communication and IT skills. She can adapt to fast-paced environments and work well under pressure, both independently and as part of a team.

Her previous roles include a Client-Services Coordinator, Team Secretary and Employer Liaison Coordinator.

Interesting fun facts fact about Nicole:

She performed as a dancer in the 2012 London Olympics opening and closing ceremonies.
She can complete the Rubik’s Cube in less than a minute.
She can play the trumpet.
She can play the piano.

So, there you have it. Very impressive indeed. If anyone has some help to offer please contact Nicole at nicole.walters92 AT yahoo DOT co DOT uk. Cheers!

Successful Brits in Toronto: Miranda Anthistle

Miranda Anthistle

Look familiar? Then you watch CTV Toronto.

Brits in Toronto got an anonymous news tip the other day (thanks Brian, see you at Scallywags next Saturday?) and not being ones to burn our sources, decided to follow up on the scoop.

Five minutes of hard Googling later we discovered Miranda Anthistle, a Successful Brit in Toronto, who is a reporter at CTV Toronto.

Sometimes those people reporting the news become the news. So much so, in fact, that we requested an exclusive e-mail interview that Miranda happily agreed to … and here’s the result. (Didn’t have time to fact check it because Dufferin Mall was closing and we still had some Crimbo stuff to get, but it looks pretty honest.)

What made you decide to choose Toronto as a city of choice? Did you plan a permanent move, or wanted to “try it for a while and see how it goes” and it turned out to be longer than planned?

I didn’t have a choice! It was already a done deal before I was born. My mum grew up in Toronto, while my dad grew up in London which is where they ended up meeting one another through a mutual friend.

When my dad proposed, my mum said she would marry him … but only if he promised they would eventually move to Toronto where most of her family still lived.

I was born in London and grew up there until I started primary school.

What steps did you take to land your first Toronto job? Did the infamous “Canadian experience” hinder you in any way?

I had to leave the city in order to land my first on-air gig in Toronto!

I started in Medicine Hat, Alberta (which actually has a huge British population due to the nearby army base that houses BATUS: British Army Training Unit Suffield).

From there I worked in Hamilton before moving back to Toronto to work at Bell Media as a reporter.

What’s the best/worst aspects of living in Toronto?

The best part of living in Toronto is that the whole world is right at your doorstep. I grew up with friends from a variety of different cultures which exposed me to so many incredible experiences.

I have the most eclectic taste in music and love all types of food.

And in Toronto it doesn’t matter what mood you’re in — there’s always a dance floor or restaurant nearby to scratch that itch!

The worst part about living in Toronto? Trying to buy property downtown that’s larger than a shoebox without breaking the bank.

And of course, the winter weather. I can’t stand the cold!

Do you make an effort to connect with other Brits in the city, or just meet them when chance allows it?

I’m always excited to run into British people and usually ask off the top who they support. If it’s Arsenal, I’m terribly disappointed, but I try not to judge! [Editor’s note: feel free to judge away, Miranda, we all do :-)]

My great uncle played for Tottenham and my family have always been Spurs supporters through and through. COME ON YOU SPURS!

Thanks Miranda! If anyone wants to connect, here are her Instagram and Twitter accounts.

Air Transat tests British expats in Canada for homesickness

Air Transat

“Here’s a clue: it’s big and rhymes with hen.”

Air Transat’s latest campaign aims to offer customers a tongue-in-cheek cure for homesickness at the holiday season.

In the video, British expats living in Canada are told they are participating in a scientific study that will help cure their homesickness. While hooked up to a brain scanner, they are shown photos of things like a cup of tea, Big Ben and an English terrier to test just how homesick they are.

The researcher then reveals that she works for Air Transat, giving participants a free ticket to the UK, the only real cure for their homesickness.

Full story here … and you’ll be cutting dusty onions by the end.

Well played, Air Transat!

Brits making the move to Toronto — Part 3: Life so far

Andy McLachlan island

Andy’s dodgy selfie while working on Toronto Islands during the summer

Back in September 2017 we started a series of posts following the real-life adventures of Brits moving to Toronto. The Brit in question is Andy McLachlan and you can read parts 1 and 2 here.

Andy has sent us part three — a quick update on life so far. Read on and hear how this Brit is getting on with a new life in Toronto …

Part 3: Life so far

Since I last contacted you with my A-Z of Toronto, I have continued to exist. The family is doing fine — we finally secured a full-time daycare place for our youngest son in September, so that has ended my ~9 months of child wrangling.

I’ve also enjoyed doing some volunteering, playing with Raspberry Pi projects and drumming with a band called Tay Sera but alas, it’s now high time for me to find a serious job.

So far I’ve been doing some freelance writing and part-time work for Toronto Bicycle Tours as a tour guide on the Islands. People from all over the world go on these tours and it is mostly seasonal work; things have now slowed down a lot for the winter. Only a handful of people have braved the outdoors in November; mostly hardy folk from the Netherlands and elsewhere in Canada.

Overall, it has been a nice change for me to work outside, and to be paid to improve my fitness.

I’ve been applying for professional jobs and I have had a couple of interviews, but nothing right has come along yet.

Please could you do a shout-out to see if anyone out there could employ a nerdy scientist Brit who likes bikes? My LinkedIn profile can be found here.

Former Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger in conversation with Toronto Star editor Irene Gentle

Alan Rusbridger

WikiLeaks? Tick. Phone-hacking scandal? Tick. Edward Snowden stuff? Tick.

Brits in Toronto got the heads-up on a forthcoming event that will appeal to those aficionados of the British press who will get the chance to hear former Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger in conversation with Toronto Star editor Irene Gentle.

Over a 20-year career as editor of the British daily The Guardian, Alan Rusbridger oversaw the publication of ground-breaking journalism: the WikiLeaks story, the phone-hacking scandal, the mass government surveillance as disclosed by U.S National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden.

As he managed the transition from national print newspaper to news site with a strong global online readership, he championed free access and strong journalistic standards. But decisions made along the way were not without their challenges and controversies.

Join Rusbridger for this conversation with Irene Gentle, editor of the Toronto Star, and for the Canadian launch of his book Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why It Matters Now.

Thursday, November 29
6:00 p.m. Doors open | 7:00 p.m. Discussion | 8:30 p.m. Reception (Cash bar)
Isabel Bader Theatre, 93 Charles St. West, Toronto
Tickets = $20-$30

More details here.